Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11189/8109
Title: Risk factors of Oesophageal Cancer in South Africa
Authors: Matsha, Tandi Edith 
Keywords: Oesophageal cancer;Risk factors;South Africa;Clinical Chemists;histology
Issue Date: 2009
Publisher: International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC)
Source: Matsha, T. 2009. Risk factors of Oesophageal Cancer in South Africa. (In: 5th Biennial Scientific Conference of the Association of Clinical Chemists of Nigeria/Inauguration of the African Federation of Clinical Chemistry Ibadan, Nigeria, 25 – 28 October 2009). [https://accnnigeria.org/plenary%20speakers.html]
Conference: 5th Biennial Scientific Conference of the Association of Clinical Chemists of Nigeria/Inauguration of the African Federation of Clinical Chemistry Ibadan, Nigeria, 25 – 28 October 2009 
Abstract: Oesophageal cancer is one of the most fatal cancers worldwide with a five-year survival below 15%. The incidence, histology and aetiology of oesophageal cancer vary remarkably between and within countries as well as between ethnic groups. In South Africa the disease affects mainly African males and the highest incidence of oesophageal cancer occurs in the Transkei region of the Eastern Cape. Risk factors that have been reported to play a predominant role in the aetiology of oesophageal cancer include chronic irritation to the oesophageal mucosa, poverty, nutritional deficiencies, Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, alcohol and smoking. However, none of them seem to singularly account for the high incidence rates observed in several high-risk areas as well as the dramatic variations in the frequency of oesophageal cancer in distinct geographic areas. Infection by human papillomaviruses was first implicated in the aetiology of oesophageal cancer in 1982. We have demonstrated the presence of low-risk HPV type 11 in subjects with squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus as well as subjects with dysplasia from South Africa. The E6 proteins of high-risk HPV contribute to tumorigenesis by interacting with wild type p53 and induce its degradation. However, HPV type 11 is known to bind to the p53 - carboxyl terminus without inducing its degradation.
Description: Conference Paper Abstract
URI: https://accnnigeria.org/plenary%20speakers.html
http://hdl.handle.net/11189/8109
Appears in Collections:HWSci - Conference Papers

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Risk factors of Oesophageal Cancer in South Africa..pdfConference Paper Abstract97.39 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
Show full item record

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in Digital Knowledge are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.