Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11189/7449
Title: Building consensus for the development of child eye care services in South Darfur State in Sudan using the Delphi technique
Authors: Alrasheed, Saif H 
Naidoo, Kovin S. 
Clarke-Farr, Peter C 
Binnawi, Kamal H. 
Keywords: Visually impaired children;poor countries;childhood eye care services;South Darfur State, Sudan;Delphi technique
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: AOSIS
Source: Alrasheed, S. H., Naidoo, K. S., Clarke-Farr, P. C. et al. 2018. Building consensus for the development of child eye care services in South Darfur State in Sudan using the Delphi technique. African Journal of Primary Health Care & Family Medicine, 10(1): a1767. [https://doi.org/10.4102/phcfm.v10i1.1767]
Journal: African Journal of Primary Health Care & Family Medicine 
Abstract: Background: Global estimates suggest there are almost 19 million visually impaired children worldwide, most of whom reside in poor countries, with the major cause being treatable. Aim: To determine the barriers to accessing childhood eye care services and to develop an eye care plan for children in South Darfur State, Sudan. Setting: The study took place in South Darfur State, Sudan. Methods: The classical Delphi technique was used to build consensus on a list of statements, which were generated based on the themes established by the experts, as well as on an extensive literature review. Results: Response rates ranged from 90% in the first round (n = 18), 100% in the second round (n = 18) to 89% in the third and fi round (n = 16). The total number of statements recommended by the Delphi panellists for development of the paediatric eye care plan, was 60 based on a consensus level of 80% agreement or more. The expert’s consensus on the following key elements for promotion and improvement of child eye care: The main barriers to accessing child eye care were high poverty rate, unavailability of child eye services and a lack of community awareness. The challenges facing visually impaired children were an absence of paediatric ophthalmologists, low vision and orthoptic services. Conclusion: The main barriers to accessing child eye care services were financial, clinical access and lack of knowledge. There should be greater collaboration between the Ministries of Health, Education and non-governmental organisations (NGOs), to work together in addressing these barriers.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11189/7449
ISSN: 2071-2936
2071-2928
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/phcfm.v10i1.1767
Appears in Collections:HWSci - Journal Articles (DHET subsidised)

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