Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11189/6195
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGarraway, Jamesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-16T10:09:48Z-
dc.date.available2018-02-16T10:09:48Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.issn1469-8366-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11189/6195-
dc.description.abstractThough the future cannot be accurately predicted, it is possible to envisage a number of probable developments which can promote thinking about the future and so promote a more informed stance about what should or should not be done. Studies in technology and society have claimed that the use of a type of forecasting using plausible but imaginary narratives, fictive scripts, promotes reflection on and so learning about possible futures among innovators. In this enquiry, the aim was to ascertain whether such forecasting methods could be shown to encourage engagement and learning among academics in a different context, that of future curriculum development in the university. Analysis of data drawn from curriculum workshops suggests that a fictive script approach does hold promise for promoting anticipatory learning among academics and thus could be considered as a curriculum development tool.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofHigher Education Research & Developmenten_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/za/-
dc.subjectCurriculum changesen_US
dc.subjectFictive scriptsen_US
dc.subjectReflective enquiryen_US
dc.subjectScenariosen_US
dc.titleFuture-orientated approaches to curriculum development: fictive scriptingen_US
dc.type.patentArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1080/07294360.2016.1170765-
Appears in Collections:Edu - Journal Articles (DHET subsidised)
Show simple item record

Page view(s)

51
checked on Jan 20, 2021

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons