Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11189/5655
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNchu, Felix-
dc.contributor.authorMagano, Solomon R-
dc.contributor.authorElof, Jacobus N-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-05T13:11:17Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-05T13:11:17Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationNchu, F., Magano, S.R. & Eloff, J.N., 2016, ‘Repellent activities of dichloromethane extract of Allium sativum (garlic) (Liliaceae) against Hyalomma rufipes (Acari)’, Journal of the South African Veterinary Association 87(1), a1356. http://dx.doi. org/10.4102/en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi. org/10.4102/jsava. v87i1.1356-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11189/5655-
dc.description.abstractDichloromethane (DCM) extract of garlic (Allium sativum Linn.) bulbs was assessed for its repellent effect against the hard tick, Hyalomma rufipes (Acari: Ixodidae) using two tick behavioural bioassays; Type A and Type B repellency bioassays, under laboratory conditions. These bioassays exploit the questing behaviour of H. rufipes, a tick that in nature displays ambush strategy, seeking its host by climbing up on vegetation and attaching to a passing host. One hundred microlitres (100 µL) of the test solution containing DCM extract of garlic bulbs and DCM at concentrations of 0.35%, 0.7% or 1.4% w/v were evaluated. DCM only was used for control. Tick repellency increased significantly (R2 = 0.98) with increasing concentration (40.03% – 86.96%) yielding an EC50 of 0.45% w/v in Type B repellency bioassay. At concentration of 1.4% w/v, the DCM extract of garlic bulbs produced high repellency index of 87% (male ticks) and 87.5% (female ticks) in the Type A repellency bioassay. Only 4% avoidance of male ticks or female ticks was recorded in the Type B repellency bioassay. In the corresponding controls, the mean numbers of non-repelled male or female ticks were 80% and 41 males or 38 females of 50 ticks in the Type A and Type B repellency bioassays, respectively. The variations in the results could be attributed to the difference in tick repellent behaviours that were assessed by the two repellency bioassays; the Type A repellency bioassay assessed repellent effect of garlic extracts without discriminating between deterrence and avoidance whereas the Type B repellency bioassay only assessed avoidance response. Generally, DCM extract of garlic was repellent against H. rufipes, albeit weak tick repellency was obtained in the Type B repellency bioassay. Furthermore, this study established that the tick repellent activity of garlic extracts is predominantly by deterrence.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAOSISen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/za/-
dc.subjectAllium sativum (garlic) (Liliaceae)en_US
dc.subjectHyalomma rufipes (Acari)en_US
dc.subjectDichloromethane (DCM)en_US
dc.titleRepellent activities of dichloromethane extract of Allium sativum (garlic) (Liliaceae) against Hyalomma rufipes (Acari)en_US
dc.type.patentArticleen_US
Appears in Collections:Appsc - Journal Articles (DHET subsidised)
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Nchu_Felix_Magano_Solomon_R_Elof_Jacobus_N_AppSci_2016.pdfMain article2.03 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
Show simple item record

Page view(s)

23
Last Week
0
Last month
0
checked on May 25, 2019

Download(s)

10
checked on May 25, 2019

Google ScholarTM

Check


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons