Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11189/5029
Title: Susceptibility of Riparian Wetland Plants to Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) Accumulation
Authors: Mudumbi, JBN 
Ntwampe, Seteno KO 
Muganza, M 
Keywords: perfluorinated compounds;wetland plants;reed grass;bioconcentration factor (BCF),;perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)
Issue Date: 2013
Publisher: International Journal of Phytoremediation
Source: Mudumbi, J.B.N., Ntwampe, S.K.O., Muganza, M. and Okonkwo, J.O., 2014. Susceptibility of Riparian Wetland Plants to Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) Accumulation. International journal of phytoremediation, 16(9),926-936.
Abstract: As plants have been shown to accumulate organic compounds from contaminated sediments, there is a potential for long-lasting ecological impact as a result of contaminant accumulation in riparian areas of wetlands, particularly the accumulation of non-biodegradable contaminants such as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). In this study, commonly found riparian wetland plants including reeds, i.e., Xanthium strumarium, Phragmites australis, Schoenoplectus corymbosus, Ruppia maritime; Populus canescens, Polygonum salicifolium, Cyperus congestus; Persicaria amphibian, Ficus carica, Artemisia schmidtiana, Eichhornia crassipes, were studied to determine their susceptibility to PFOA accumulation from PFOA contaminated riparian sediment with a known PFOA concentration, using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). The bioconcentration factor (BCF) indicated that the plants affinity to PFOA accumulation was; E. crassipes, > P. salicifolium, > C. congestus, > P. x canescens, > P. amphibian, > F. carica, > A. schmidtiana, > X. strumarium, > P. australis, > R. maritime, > S. corymbosus. The concentration of PFOA in the plants and/or reeds was in the range 11.7 to 38 ng/g, with a BCF range of 0.05 to 0.37. The highest BCF was observed in sediment for which its core water had a high salinity, total organic carbon and a pH which was near neutral. As the studied plants had a higher affinity for PFOA, the resultant effect is that riparian plants such as E. crassipes, X. strumarium, and P. salicifolium, typified by a fibrous rooting system, which grow closer to the water edge, exacerbate the accumulation of PFOA in riparian wetlands.
URI: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15226514.2013.810574
http://hdl.handle.net/11189/5029
Appears in Collections:Prof. Seteno Karabo Ntwampe

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